Water Lettuce

Planting Depth:  Floater

Sunshine:  Full Sun or Partial Shade

Longevity:  Annual

Tropical, free floating plant.  Velvety ribbed leaves form delicate, pale green rosettes.  Resembles a cabbage plant. The leaves grows 8 – 10 in. long and 4 in. wide and produce plantlets that stretch out from the mother plant on slender stems.  These can be separated and the older plants can be thinned out. If yellowing occurs the plants can be separated from the pond and fertilized.  Excellent in shady ponds.

4 Leaf Water Clover

Planting Depth: 4 inches to 9 inches below the surface of the water

Sunshine:  Partial Shade

Blooming Window:  Grown for foliage

Longevity:  Perennial

Aquatic variegated four leaf clover. A favorite of everyone who grows it! Real 1-3″ four-leaf clover leaves float on the surface of the pond as the trailing vine spreads under the water. It does best when planted 4 inches to 9 inches below the surface of the water. Very easy growers, these plants are great for surface coverage and algae elimination. They also provide a protection from predators for koi and other fish especially important for vulnerable young fish.

Water Hyacinth

Planting Depth:  Floater

Sunshine:  Full Sun or Partial Shade

Blooming Window:  Spring through Autumn

Longevity:  Annual

Noted for its prominent lavender-blue flowers and fleshy, rounded, floating leaves. Water Hyacinth grows quickly in warm water. A few plants bought in the Spring can easily turn into a few hundred by Fall (they are excellent for compost in the perennial border or the vegetable garden). Plants propagate readily from leaf shoots which develop into new plants. It is a welcome addition to the water garden for its ability to filter out unwanted nutrients and for its attractive flowers.

Growing water hyacinth plants is easy. Once established, they require no special care except occasional thinning to keep them from choking out everything else in the pond. Under perfect conditions, a colony of water hyacinths can double its size every 8 to 12 days.

Water hyacinths need full sun and hot summer temperatures. Introduce them to the garden by scattering bunches of plants over the surface of the water. They quickly take hold and begin to grow. Thin the plants when they cover more than 60 percent of the water surface.